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09
Feb 2017

How to Launder a Quilt

How to Launder a Quilt

Let’s Come Clean

Welcome back! As always, Merry Moose enjoys keeping in touch with you. We encourage you to show off your projects, so that others can enjoy your things of beauty. If friends are so inclined, they may want to give you a shout out, or an Atta Girl.

Merry Moose knows that you treasure your quilted creation and want to preserve its life, beautiful fabric, texture, and pattern. Below are a few tips on taking special care:

Always, before laundering your quilt, check to make sure that your fabric is colorfast. To test for this:  Dampen a white cloth with cold water, and gently rub the cloth over each dissimilar color or fabric on the quilt. If any of the colors transfer from the quilt to the white cloth, Merry Moose recommends not to wash your quilt. If you do wash it, however, we recommend that you use a color catcher of some sort.  I’ve been known to put two into the washer the first time it’s washed.  These can be found with other laundry products at your grocery store

It is sometimes recommended to hand wash your quilt. Raveling has been known to happen even with new quilts in a machine. If you do choose to machine wash your quilt, be sure to wash it in cold water in a mild detergent.  Selecting the gentle cycle and a very short agitation time is best.  I, personally, like the looks of a quilt after it has been washed.

Hand washing your quilt, although, takes a bit more effort, will be better for your work of art:

Fill your tub or deep(ish) laundry sink with cold water. Be sure that whichever you choose is clean with no deposits that could harm the fabric. Launder with a mild liquid detergent. Add to the water, a ½ cup of distilled white vinegar. This will create a softer fabric and will liven up the colors.

Since the cat is nowhere to be found, place your quilt in the water, and make sure that every part of it  gets wet. With your hands, gently agitate your quilt. Keep it in the water for about 9 or 10 minutes. Drain the water and fill the tub back up with fresh cold water. Rinse and repeat until the water in the sink is clear, and along with the quilt, has no suds.

To dry your quilt, you will want to take special care. Since threads can break and seams can rip, be careful by first folding, and then rolling to drain any water that’s left behind. Dry the quilt flat on heavy towels or cloths. You may also dry your quilt outdoors over chairs, on a table, or on the lawn.  If you choose to dry it in the dryer (I do most of the time), it truly gives it the antique look as the cotton wrinkles and who’s going to iron it?? Just use medium to low heat.

Merry Moose hopes that with these comprehensive instructions, you now will enjoy your artful handiwork even more. You can now keep your quilt clean, fresh and appreciated.

Thank you for visiting!

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